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Lynn Pasquerella - November 15, 2010

Lynn Pasquerella

President and Professor of Philosophy, Mount Holyoke College

"Overcoming Moral Distress: Reforming Organizations and Institutions"

8:00 PM Monday, November 15, 2010
University Theatre

A longtime philosophy professor at the University of Rhode Island and an internationally celebrated medical ethicist, Lynn Pasquerella became President of Mount Holyoke College on July 1, 2010. She will speak about her experiences in Africa, where she served as project leader for a research team working to empower women in an AIDS-ravaged area of Kenya, and in American higher education, where she is a leader in promoting the careers of women in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines.

You may also listen to a podcast of the lecture here.

"Biology and the Concept of Death as Un-American"

3:10 PM Monday, November 15, 2010
Gallagher Business Building 123

You are cordially invited to attend a seminar with Lynn Pasquerella, who became President of Mount Holyoke College on July 1, 2010. Her route to this professional destination had an unlikely beginning, with a period of matriculation at Quinebaug Community College. She transferred from there to Mount Holyoke College, studied philosophy, and graduated from that institution magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa in 1980. Ph.D. work in philosophy at Brown University followed. From 1985 to 2008, she taught philosophy at the University of Rhode Island. In 2004, she became Associate Dean of URI’s graduate school and, in 2006, was named Provost for Research and Dean of the Graduate School. In 2008, she joined the University of Hartford as Provost and Chief Academic Officer.

President Pasquerella has written extensively in the areas of medical ethics, theoretical and applied ethics, metaphysics, public policy, and the philosophy of law. Her publications include Ethical Issues in Home Health Care (2002), co-authored with Rosalind Ladd and Sheri Smith, and Ethical Dilemmas in Public Administration (1996), edited with Alfred Killea and Michael Vocino. She has published numerous articles in scholarly journals and anthologies. In addition to her academic work, she has been a leader in effecting social change. She served as project leader for a research team with the African Center for Engineering Social Solutions, with the aim of empowering women in an AIDS-ravaged area of Kenya. She also was the principal investigator on a $3.5 million NSF ADVANCE grant to promote the careers of women in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, as well as on a $750,000 NSF-Northeast Alliance for Graduate Education and Professoriate grant to encourage the recruitment of underrepresented groups into these disciplines.