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Simon Hutchinson

Contact
Area: 
Compostion
Phone: 
243-6889 (Faculty Message Phone)
Room: 
MUS 203
Simon Hutchinson’s work as a composer incorporates his experience across diverse musical styles from all over the world. Drawing especially from jazz, the avant-garde, baroque, and the traditions of Japan, Korea, and Indonesia, Hutchinson creates unique music and intermedia works that explore themes of modernity, technology, and global community.
 
Hutchinson holds a PhD in Composition with supporting coursework in Intermedia Music Technology from the University of Oregon, where he was recognized as both the Outstanding Graduate Scholar in Music and the Outstanding Graduate Student in Music Technology. Hutchinson also holds an MA in Composition from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a BA in Music from Bates College. Notable composition teachers include Robert Kyr, David Crumb, Jeffrey Stolet, Hi Kyung Kim, David Cope, Peter Elsea, and Bill Matthews. Additionally, Hutchinson has spent several years in Japan studying shamisen (three-stringed lute) and Japanese Folk Music with virtuoso Sato Asao and shakuhachi (vertical bamboo flute) with Sato Chikuen.
 
Hutchinson’s compositions have been performed across the US, Europe, and Asia, as well as at various music festivals and conferences, including NIME (2013), the Kyma International Sound Symposium (2013), SEAMUS (2012, 2011), Miso Music Portugal (2011, 2010), the Music Today Festival (2011), April in Santa Cruz (2007, 2006), and the Oregon Bach Festival Composers Symposium (2009). In 2008, he was awarded the 1st Young Composers’ Competition of CMEK (Contemporary Music Ensemble Korea, 2008), and his work has also been recognized by the Sasakawa Young Leader’s Fellowship Fund (SYLFF) OUS Fellowship, University of Oregon Graduate School Research Awards (2010, 2008), the University of Oregon Ruth Close Musical Fellowship (2008), the Porter Associate Fellows Graduate Arts Research Grant (2007), UCSC Music Department Graduate Fellowships (2006, 2005), and the Bates College Key Music Award (2002).