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The Ethics of Geoengineering

Investigating the Moral Challenges of Solar Radiation Management
 

A team of University of Montana researchers has been awarded a National Science Foundation grant to study the ethics of solar radiation management (SRM), the intentional engineering of the earth's climate to offset climate change.

The project brings social science research together with ethical analysis to examine the views of stakeholders from politically powerful and marginalized populations on the moral challenges associated with deliberately engineering the climate.

Philosopher Dane Scott Ph.D, associate professor in the Department of Society and Conservation and director of the Ethics and Public Affairs Program, along with Christopher Preston, associate professor in the Department of Philosophy and Ethics and Public Affairs Research Fellow, will work with social scientist Laurie Yung, director of UM's Wilderness Institute and an assistant professor in the Department of Society and Conservation, on this interdisciplinary research project.

As part of their work, the research team and the Ethics and Public Affairs Program hosted a three-day workshop in October of 2010 at the University of Montana. In April of 2012, they created a web resource on the ethics of geoengineering.  In July of 2012, they published the first book length collection of essays on the ethics of solar radiation management.  In the same month, they put together a special issue of the journal Ethics, Policy, and Environment on climate engineering.

Leading climate scientists, philosophers and policy experts from several North American universities and institutes are assisting the UM team in shaping their publications and the resource center.

For more details visit the project summary.

For more information, contact the Ethics and Public Affairs Program at 406-243-6605

Special Notice

***Interviews with participanting experts can be viewed here***



National Science Foundation