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Degrees & Courses

Bitterroot College Course Descriptions

Applied Arts and Sciences (AASC)

AASC 100 Introduction to the University Experience (3 credits)

Offered autumn. Exploring the transition to college; introduction to campus resources, academic policies and expectations; general education and advising; study skills and time management; critical thinking; exploring majors and career choices; campus diversity and personal development. Offered as an elective for incoming AA students.

AASC 101 Study and Learning Strategies (2 credits)

Offered spring. This course facilitates the development of many skills needed by the student to be competent and successful in higher education. Topics include management of classroom performance, time and money; personal health and safety; listening; memory; critical thinking; reading; note making; ethics; and testing. Elective credit only.


Accounting Courses (ACTG)

ACTG 100 Essentials of Accounting (4 credits)

Offered spring. Introduction to basic double-entry accounting. Emphasis on analyzing, journalizing, and posting transactions; trial balance, worksheet, financial statements, and adjusting/closing procedures, cash control and completing the accounting cycle.

ACTG 101 Accounting Procedures I (4 credits)

Offered autumn. Basic double-entry accounting. Emphasis on analyzing, journalizing, and posting transactions; trial balance, worksheet, financial statements, and adjusting/closing procedures, accounting systems, and cash control. Accepted as a substitute for UM-COT degrees requiring ACTG 100 Essentials of Accounting.

ACTG 102 Accounting Procedures II (4 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. Prereq., ACTG 101 with competency test score of 75% or better. Expansion of ACTG 101 including receivables, inventories, plant and intangible assets, and expanded liabilities. Includes partnerships, corporations, long-term liabilities, investments in debt and equity securities, and the statement of cash flow.


Allied Health Medical Support Courses (AHMS)

AHMS 270E Medical Law and Ethics (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Ethical decision-making tools for addressing common ethical issues in the health professions.


Anthropology Courses (ANTY)

ANTY 101H Introduction to Anthropology (3 credits)

Offered spring. A survey of anthropology which introduces the fundamental concepts, methods and perspectives of the field. The description and analysis of human culture, its growth and change. The nature and functions of social institutions.


Art Courses (ARTZ)

ARTZ 105A Visual Language - Drawing (3 credits)

Offered autumn. An introduction to visual language, concepts, and studio practicum. Focus on basic skills development in rendering volume, pictorial depth, and figure/ground relationships. Research in historical and contemporary approaches to drawing.

ARTZ 106A Visual Language - 2-D Foundations (3 credits)

Offered spring. An introduction to the formal elements and principles of design, color theory, and predominant western and non-western historical styles. Emphasis on solving specific design problems.

ARTZ 108A Visual Language - 3-D Foundations (3 credits)

Offered intermittently summer. Basic three-dimensional course for both general education and beginning art students. Prerequisite to beginning sculpture and beginning ceramics. Emphasis placed on conceptualization and formal development of the 3-D object in the areas of form, mass, scale, texture, space and color.


Business Courses (BGEN)

BGEN 105S Introduction to Business (3 credits)

Offered autumn; offered summer intermittently. Introduction to the world of business. Examines capitalism, the economic environment, the types of business organizations, management, marketing, production, labor, financing, and business/governmental relations.

BGEN 235 Business Law (3 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. An overview of law as it applies to business transactions. Topics include the nature and source of law; courts and procedure; contracts, sales, and employment; commercial paper; bailment's; property; business organizations; insurance; wills and estate planning; consumer and creditor protection; torts; criminal law; and agency law. Credit not allowed for both BGEN 135T and BADM 257.


Biology - General Courses (BIOB)

BIOB 101N/102N Discover Biology - Lecture and Lab (3 credits)

Offered every autumn and intermittently spring. Contemporary exploration of the organization and complexity of living organisms and the systems in which they live. The central question of biology - relationship between form and function, acquisition and use of energy, and continuity between generations will be addressed through lectures and laboratory investigations. Credit not allowed toward a major in biology. Degree credit not allowed for both BIOB 101N and BIOB 160N.

BIOB 160N Principles of Living Systems- Lecture and Lab (4 credits)

Offered intermittently autumn. Unifying principles of biological structure-function relationships at different levels of organization and complexity. Consideration of reproduction, genetics, development, evolution, ecosystems, as well as the inter-relationships of the human species to the rest of life. Lab experiences illustrate biological principles underlying growth, reproduction, development, genetics and physiology. Degree credit not allowed for both BIOB 101N and 160N.


Biology - Human Courses (BIOH)

BIOH 108 Basic Anatomy (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Structures of the human body and their basic functions.

BIOH 201N/202N Anatomy & Physiology I Lecture & Lab (4 credits)

Offered autumn. Prereq., introductory science course or college-prep high school biology course recommended. Comprehensive knowledge of human form and function necessary for students preparing for health-related professions. Emphasis on structure, function and homeostatic regulation of body systems with presentation of basic concepts in chemistry and microbiology as they relate to human anatomy and physiology. Covers tissues through nervous system. Required integrated laboratory includes some dissection.

BIOH 211N/212N Anatomy & Physiology II Lecture & Lab (4 credits)

Offered spring. Prereq., BIOH 201N. Continuation of 201N. Comprehensive knowledge of human form and function necessary for students in health-related programs. Emphasis on structure function and homeostatic regulation of body systems with presentation of basic concepts in chemistry and microbiology as they relate to human anatomy and physiology. Covers endocrine through reproductive systems. Required integrated laboratory includes frequent dissection.


Biology - Microbiology (BIOM)

BIOM 250 Microbiology for Health Sciences - Lecture (3 credits)

Offered spring. Infectious diseases, including concepts of virulence, resistance, prevention and control of microbial diseases in the individual and in the community. If laboratory experience is desired, the student may enroll concurrently in BIOM 251. Credit not allowed toward a major in microbiology.

BIOM 251 Microbiology for Health Sciences - Lab (1 credit)

Offered spring. Observation of live microorganisms, their characteristics and activities. Experience with microbiological techniques. Credit not allowed toward a major in microbiology.


Biology - Organismal (BIOO)

BIOO 105N Introduction to Botany (3 credits)

Offered spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Introduction to the plant kingdom including anatomy, physiology and ecology.


Building Maintenance Engineering (BME)

BME 122 Electricity (5 credits)

Offered autumn. The electrical laws and principles pertaining to DC and AC circuits. Includes current, voltage, resistance, power, load, panels, feeders, lamps, motors, and fuses. Introduction to wiring methods and materials in conformance with the National Electric Code (NEC). Includes installation and replacement of light fixtures, heaters, GFCI's, switches, receptacles, and electrical thermostats.


Business (BUS)

BUS 235 Financial Planning (3 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. This course deals with personal financial planning and investments. The course will focus on a variety of personal finance topics including, the time value of money, liquid asset management, federal income and estate taxes, credit cards, consumer loans, automobile purchases, and insurance. The course then looks at long-term investing.


Chemistry Courses (CHMY)

CHMY 121N Introduction to General Chemistry Lecture & Discussion (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. First semester of an introduction to general, inorganic, organic and biological chemistry.

CHMY 122 Introduction to General Chemistry Lab (1 credit)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq. or coreq., CHMY 121N or equivalent. A laboratory course emphasizing inorganic chemistry, quantitative relations and synthesis of inorganic and organic compounds.


Communications Courses (COMX)

COMX 111A Introduction to Public Speaking (3 credits)

Offered autumn and intermittently spring; offered summer intermittently. Introduction to techniques for preparing and delivering effective presentations as well as constructive criticism.

COMX 115S Introduction to Interpersonal Communications (3 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. Focus on communicating and listening more clearly to improve personal and professional relationships. Topics include forms of communication, communication and identity, emotion, conflict, climates, gender, and cultural diversity.


Computer Application Courses (CAPP)

CAPP 91 Computer Basics (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Credit does not count toward Certificate of Applied Science, Associate of Applied Science, Associate of Arts, or Baccalaureate degree. Introduction to keyboarding, using a mouse, computer terminology, hardware, and software, including wire/wireless communications and multimedia devices. Students utilize practical exercises in word processing, spread sheet, database, and presentation applications to create projects common to business and industry in a networked computing environment. Internet research, email usage, and keyboarding proficiency are integrated. This course is intended for students with limited computer experience or confidence; course prepares students to advance to CAPP 120 Introduction to Computers.

CAPP 120 Introduction to Computers (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Introduction to computer terminology, hardware, and software, including wire/wireless communications and multimedia devices. Students utilize word processing, spread sheet, database, and presentation applications to create projects common to business and industry in a networked computing environment. Internet research, email usage, and keyboarding proficiency are integrated.

CAPP 154 MS Word (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Preparation of business forms, correspondence, mail merges, columnar projects, and reports using up-to-date software. Business related application projects, graphics, and printer operation are included.

CAPP 156 MS Excel (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., CAPP 120 and M 090 or M 095. Emphasis on the use of workbooks and sheets to solve business problems. Includes projects relating to data and graphs/charts.


Computer Science Courses (CSCI)

CSCI 105 Computer Fluency (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., CAPP 120 or demonstrated computing experience. Introduces the skills and concepts of information technology, both from practical and a more theoretical point of view. During lectures and interactive computer labs, students will explore a wide range of digital and information technologies, including common PC applications, networking, databases, privacy, and security.

CSCI 110 Programming with Visual Basic I (3 credits)

Offered autumn. Prereq., M 090. An introduction to object-oriented programming using an even-driven paradigm. Basic concepts of control structures, data handling, documentation, and error control. Fundamentals of algorithm design and structured software development.

CSCI 172 Introduction to Computer Modeling (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., CAPP 120 or demonstrated computing experience. Problem solving and data modeling using computer productivity software. Emphasis using spreadsheets and databases for data analysis. Formal presentation of results.


Economic Courses (ECNS)

ECNS 201N Principles of Microeconomics (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. The nature of a market economy, economic decisions of the household and firm, competition and monopoly, value and price determination, distribution of income and applied microeconomic topics.


Geology Courses (GEO)

GEO 101N Introduction to Physical Geology/Lecture (3 credits)

Offered autumn. General geology including the work of wind, flowing water, glacial ice, gravity, earthquakes, volcanoes and plate tectonics in shaping the earth.

GEO 102N Introduction to Physical Geology/Lab (1 credit)

Offered autumn. Prereq. or coreq., any geoscience courses below GEO 130. A series of laboratory and field experiences designed around basic geologic processes and materials. Familiarization with common minerals, rocks, land forms, and structures. Intended to provide laboratory experience with any geoscience course below GEO 130.


Geography Courses (GPHY)

GPHY 111N Introduction to Physical Geography/Lecture (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 095 or above, or appropriate score on mathematics placement examination. Introduction to the earth's major natural environmental systems, their spatial distribution and interrelationships, including weather and climate, vegetation and ecosystems, soils, landforms, and earth-surface processes.

GPHY 121S Introduction to Human Geography (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Introduction to Human Geography focuses upon the linkages between geography and society including analysis of regions, ethnic groups, urban landscapes, migration and population change, geopolitics, economics, and cultural differences


History (HSTA)

HSTA 101H/Y American History I (4 credits)

Offered autumn. A comprehensive introductory history of Colonial, Revolutionary and 19th century America, to 1877.

HSTA 102H/Y American History II (4 credits)

Offered spring. A comprehensive introductory history of the U.S. since 1877. Lecture-discussion.


Information Technology Systems (ITS)

ITS 165 Operating Systems: Commands and Scripts (3 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. Prereq. M 090 or demonstrated computing experience. Introduction to operating system concepts through the use of contemporary software. Emphasizes file system management, networking, installation, maintenance, management, and disaster recovery practices using both the command interpreter and graphical user interface.

ITS 280 Computer Repair and Maintenance (3 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. Prereq., ITS 150. In-depth study of personal computer hardware. Focus on field replaceable components. Topics include: storage devices, processors, system boards, memory, ports, cabling, power supplies, multimedia devices, printers, and troubleshooting.

ITS 289 Professional Certification (1 credit)

Offered intermittently spring. Prereq., consent of instr. Review objectives of an information technology industry-based professional certification. Certification objectives, preparation strategies, and exam strategies included. Course can be repeated for different industry-based professional certifications.


Literature Courses (LIT)

LIT 110L Introduction to Literature (3 credits)

Offered intermittently spring. Study of how readers make meaning of texts and how texts influence readers. Emphasis on interpreting literary texts: close reading, critical analysis and effective writing. Course counts as an approved writing course with respect to UM general education requirements.


Mathematics Courses (M)

M 65 Prealgebra (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., appropriate placement score. Arithmetic and basic algebra skills needed for Introductory Algebra. Topics include integers and rational numbers, decimals and percentages with applications, ratios and proportions with applications, single variable linear equations with applications, introduction to graphing, exponents, factoring, and an introduction to polynomials. Credit does not count toward a certificate or degree. Credit does not count toward Associate of Arts, Associate of Applied Science, or Baccalaureate degrees.

M 90 Introductory Algebra (3 credits)

Offered autumn, spring, and summer. Prereq., M 065 or appropriate placement score. Review of arithmetic principles of integers and rational numbers, linear equations in one or two unknowns, and operations with polynomials and rational expressions. Credit does not count toward an Associate of Arts, Associate of Applied Science, or Baccalaureate degree.

M 95 Intermediate Algebra (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., M 090 or appropriate placement score. Topics include linear equations and systems of linear equations, inequalities, applications and graphing; polynomials; rational expressions and equations; radicals, rational exponents and complex numbers; quadratic equations; introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions. Credit does not count toward Associate of Arts or Baccalaureate degrees.

M 105 Contemporary Math (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., M 090 (MAT 005) with a grade of B- or better, or M 095, or appropriate placement score. An introduction to mathematical ideas and their impact on society. Intended for students wishing to satisfy the general education mathematics requirement.

M 111 Technical Mathematics (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., ALEKS placement ≥2. Designed to provide the mathematical background necessary for success in the industrial areas. Topics covered include percent, ratio proportion, formula evaluation, basic algebra and geometry concepts, trigonometry, measurement, statistics, and graphing. markdowns, inventory turnover, and other basic formulas. Credit does not count toward Associate of Arts or Baccalaureate degrees.

M 115 Probability and Linear Math (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., M 090 with a grade of B- or better, M 095, or appropriate placement score. Systems of linear equations and matrix algebra. Introduction to probability with emphasis on models and probabilistic reasoning. Examples of applications of the material in many fields.

M 121 College Algebra (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., M 095 or appropriate placement score. Intended to strengthen algebra skills. The study of functions and their inverses: polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.


Media Arts (MAR)

MAR 111A Fundamentals of Integrated Digital Art (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. A project-oriented editing and design course that focuses on artistic expression and its relationship to digital technology. Using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe After Effects, students will create audio/visual work in both the still image and time based mediums.


Music (MUSI)

MUSI 108A Bitterroot College Community Orchestra (1 credit)

Offered intermittently. Open to all community members. No auditions for string players; auditions dependent on size of registration pool for brass, percussion, and woodwind players (all musicians are encouraged to register). Rehearsal and performing experience in a broad range of symphonic repertoire.


Native American Studies (NASX)

NASX 191 Special Topics: North American Native American History through Art and Material Culture (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring; offered intermittently summer. This course is a general overview of traditional and modern American Indian cultures with a cross-disciplinary approach to the study of art, Native American Studies and history. The course introduces students to non-Western cultures by an in-depth analysis of art and material culture over a substantial period of time from the point of view of the cultures themselves within their own terms when possible. The course requires the student to look differently at organizing the world, challenging preconceived and stereotypical understandings of Native experiences, ways of knowing, and history that have been told from a Euro American point of view. This course highlights blended or trans-cultural processes of object making and valuation reflecting beliefs and power relations in various time eras, among tribal, intertribal and colonial power regimes. Topics covered include American Indian traditions, relations with nature, social structures and practices, spiritual beliefs and practices, gender roles, history, art, education, literature, souvenir production and contemporary artists and issues.


Natural Resource Management (NRSM)

NRSM 191 Special Topics: Water Resources - lecture (1 credit)

Offered intermittently. Course provides a basic introduction to the fundamental concepts, techniques, and knowledge required to understand and manage surface water and groundwater. Field trips and student projects will connect directly with Bitterroot Valley water resource systems. Each student is required to conduct an individual research project involving collection of data from locations of choice on the landscape to be coupled with public water data from website information. Course will provide introduction to water resource terminology, the hydrologic cycle, precipitation, evapotranspiration, infiltration, soil types, aquifer types, hydraulic properties and hydrogeology, groundwater flow, stream flow, hands-on flow measurements, water quality parameters, pollution sources and water treatment, hands-on water quality analysis, drilling and pumping impacts, irrigation and water rights overview, large water projects, urban demand for water, and land use impacts.

NRSM 192 Special Topics: Water Resources - linked lab (1 credit)

Offered intermittently. Experiential learning, field trips, and student research linked to NRSM 191 Water Resources. See description for NRSM 191.


Philosophy Courses (PHL)

PHL 110E Introduction to Ethics (3 credits)

Offered spring. An examination of the Western vision of morality through the careful study of selected writings from Aristotle, Kant and Mill. Additional works in ethics may supplement primary readings.

PHL 112E Introduction to Ethics and the Environment (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. An introductory-level ethics course with a special interest in the natural environment. The course will (a) introduce students to the three classical traditions in ethics - virtue, Kantianism, and utilitarianism, (b) ground these theories in questions about the moral status of non-humans and our moral duties to non-humans, (c) include an applied section of the course that will cover animal welfare, biotechnology, and other current topics.


Political Science Courses (PSCI)

PSCI 191 Special Topics: Community Volunteer Service (2 credits)

Offered intermittently. Course provides students with a structured volunteer experience in social service/community organizations. Opportunity engages students in active citizenship through community service.  Emphasis is on student participation and the development of citizenship skills such as problem solving, critical thinking, writing, and public speaking.  Topics addressed are citizenship in a democratic society, community action, organizational goals, client groups served, and services provided.

PSCI 210S/Y Introduction to American Government (3 credits)

Offered autumn; offered spring intermittently; offered summer intermittently. Constitutional principles, structures, and the political processes of the national government.


Psychology Courses (PSYX)

PSYX 100S Introduction to Psychology (4 credits)

Offered intermittently. Introduction to the scientific study of behavior in humans and other animals. Accepted as a substitute for UM-COT degrees requiring PSYX 161S Fundamentals of Organizational Psychology.


Science Courses (SCN)

SCN 100N Issues in Biology (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. An introductory course for students with little science background. This course explores several issues relating to human biology such as cancer, drug abuse, population growth, and genetic engineering. Also includes discussions of fundamental biological concepts such as evolution, biodiversity, and basic cell and molecular biology.

SCN 175N Integrated Physical Science (3 credits)

Offered spring. Prereq., or coreq., M 090 or M 095. An introduction to the basic principles of physics, chemistry, environmental and earth sciences with emphasis on the scientific method and process (suitable for students with little science background).


Sociology (SOCI)

SOCI 101S Introduction to Sociology (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Overview of the principles and concepts used in the study of human social interaction, groups, communities and societies.

SOCI 211S Introduction to Criminology (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Prereq., SOCI 101S (SOC 110S). A critical examination of crime in society: how crime is defined, the extent and distribution of crime, theoretical explanations of criminal behavior, and crime control efforts.


Spanish (SPNS)

SPNS 101 Elementary Spanish I (5 credits)

Offered autumn. Emphasis on oral communication, with development in all major skill areas: listening, speaking, reading and writing.

SPNS 102 Elementary Spanish II (5 credits)

Offered spring. Continuation of 101.


Statistics (STAT)

STAT 216 Introduction to Statistics/Lecture and Discussion (4 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., M 115 or consent of instr. Introduction to major ideas of statistical inference. Emphasis is on statistical reasoning and uses of statistics.


Writing Courses (WRIT)

WRIT 95 Developmental Writing (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., placement or referral by WRIT 101 instructor. Designed for students who need instruction and practice integrating critical thinking, reading and writing before entering the required first-year writing course. Credit does not count toward Associate of Arts or Baccalaureate degrees.

WRIT 101 College Writing (3 credits)

Offered autumn and spring. Prereq., WRIT 095 or passing score on placement test. Instruction and practice in both the expository writing and research process. Emphasis on the use of specific techniques of writing to develop style, unity, clarity, and force of ideas, and structure. Students are expected to write without major errors in sentence structure or mechanics.

WRIT 121 Introduction to Technical Writing (3 credits)

Offered intermittently. Course assumes a basic computer literacy. Passing score on placement test or consent of instructor. Introduction to technical writing situations with appropriate formats. Emphasis writing with document design and graphic placement introduced. Students are expected to write without major faults in grammar or usage.

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